Lynne Grundy Memorial Trust
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  Registered Charity 1072150
 
 

Award Winners

In 2017, as we approach the 20th anniversary of Lynne's death, we have made awards to:

Cat Jarman - a UK-based Norwegian scholar completing her archaeology Ph.D. (Resolving Repton? Multidisciplinary approaches to untangling Viking Age identities in Derbyshire) at the University of Bristol.  Cat will be attending the ISAS conference and a Digital Humanities workshop (organised by CESTA  at Stanford), both of which are taking place at the University of Hawaii.

Courtnay Konshuh Ph.D. - a Canadian national (currently an independent scholar) who has recently moved back to N. America from the UK and who will be presenting papers relating to her work on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles at conferences in Leeds (IMC) and Winchester this summer.

Naomi Lloyd-Jones - completing her Ph.D. at King's College London, using relational databases to build an analysis of reactions to the Irish Home Rule crisis (Deconstructing Westminster: a four nations history of the Irish Home Rule crisis, c.1885-1893).

Julia Smith D.Phil. - an independent scholar and associate member of Oxford University, member of an inter-disciplinary team developing a ground-breaking fully digital collation system (the Traherne Digital Collator).  Julia's aim is to combine an OCR-based text comparator with the fully digital image comparator to enable seamless movement between the two.

Erica Weaver - completing her PhD, Formal Orders: Reading and Writing in Late Anglo-Saxon England, at Harvard University, exploring the development of vernacular style in Old English, looking at the literary output of Winchester and its role as a cultural centre.  Erica will be presenting a paper at the ICMS in Kalamazoo this summer.

In 2016 we made awards to:

Ciaran Arthur Ph.D., to attend the London International Palaeography Summer School.

Irene Bavuso, completing her thesis (The sixth and earlier seventh centuries: preconditions of the rise of the emporia) at the University of Oxford, developing a new model to explain the economic frameworks at the origin of the trade system between England and the continent.

Rebecca Colleran, completing her thesis at the University of Edinburgh, using Humanities Computing tools for linguistic analysis of Old English and Old Frisian to address their place within the wider scheme of Germanic languages, to attend The International Conference for English Historical Linguistics in Essen.

Sabine Rausch Ph.D. to attend the Leeds IMC to present a paper (Patristic Number Symbolism in Anglo-Saxon Homilies).

In 2015 we again received far more high quality applications than we could support and have had to make some extremely difficult decisions, rejecting some applications that, under other circumstances we would have been delighted to support.  The Trust made six awards to:

Courtney Barajas, completing a PhD on landscapes in the Exeter Book at the University of Texas at Austin, to contribute to the costs of a research trip to the UK and to attend conferences at Lincoln and Leeds.

Kasandra Castle, completing a PhD on Anglo-Saxon Charters and Maledictions at the University of Toronto, to contribute to the costs of a research trip to Maidstone, Canterbury and Cambridge.  This project combines elements of both Old English and Humanities Computing.

Janel Fontaine, completing a PhD on Anglo-Saxon slavery at King's College, London, to contribute to living expenses while completing writing up, following a period of ill health.

Claire Harrill, completing a PhD at the University of Birmingham, to help cover the costs of attending the Leeds IMC to present a paper: St Margaret the Reformer?: Fictions of C11th Church Reform in Scotland.

Catalin Taranu, completing a PhD on The Construction of Anglo-Saxon Legendary History at the University of Leeds, a contribution to living costs while completing the thesis.

Zhangfeng Xu, completing a PhD on the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles at the University of Aberdeen, a contribution to the costs of re-creating a course in Old-English in a digital, interactive, multimedia form, combining Old English and Humanities Computing.

In 2014 we were overwhelmed with applications, all excellent, and were forced to make some very hard decisions.  We had to choose between equally good candidates on the basis of where we felt the money would achieve most.  In the end the Trust made six awards to:

Charlotte Ball a third year PhD student at the University of Leicester. A contribution to living costs while writing up her thesis The Serpent in Anglo-Saxon England: image, metaphor and motif.

Carl Kears a PhD student at King’s College, London.  A contribution to living costs while writing up his thesis The Places and Poetics of Hostility in MS Junius 11.

Irene Garcia Losquino a teaching fellow at the University of Aberdeen.  A contribution to the costs of publishing a monograph The Early Runic Inscriptions: their Western Features.

Joey McMullen a PhD student at Harvard University.  A contribution to living costs while writing up the final chapter of his thesis Echoes of Early Irish Influence in Anglo-Saxon Literary Landscapes.

Kathryn Maude a PhD student at King’s College, London.  A contribution to the costs of attending the International Medieval Congress at which she was not only organizing and chairing a session and speaking at a panel organized by the Royal Studies Network, but also organizing a roundtable discussion.

Matilda Watson a PhD student at King’s College, London.  A contribution to living costs while completing her thesis Contacts between England, Norway and Sweden before c. 1100, which has involved the development of significant Digital Humanities resources in addition to historical analysis.

In 2013 the Trust made 8 awards:

Tahlia Birnbaum a PhD student at the University of Sydney, toward the cost of attending the IMC at Leeds and 'Psalm Culture and the politics of translation' at Queen Mary, University of London.

Lucy Moore a small finds specialist, for the costs of studying the West Yorkshire Hoard at Leeds Museum and Galleries.

Zsuzsanna Simonkay a PhD student at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE), Budapest, Hungary, toward the cost of presenting a paper on ' The Pleasure of Friendship in Medieval English Literature'.

Sanne van der Schee a PhD student at the University of Leicester toward the cost of presenting a paper at the IMC in Leeds.

Hanna Videen a PhD student at King's College, London, toward the cost of attending the IMC in Leeds, to chair a session: 'Did They Have That Back Then? Pleasure in Anglo-Saxon England'.

Christine Voth a PhD student at the University of Cambridge toward the cost of presenting a paper onIrish pilgrims, Welsh manuscripts and Anglo-Saxon monasteries: Was script change in tenth-century England a legacy of the Celtic World?' at the ISAS conference in Dublin.

ISAS: two awards to help with travel costs for students attending the annual Conference.

In 2012 the Trust made awards to:

Leonie Dunlop a PhD student at the University of Glasgow investigating the Anglo-Saxon influence in Berwickshire, toward presenting a poster at the Trends in Toponymy conference in Berne Switzerland.

Jill Fitzgerald a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, working on her thesis: Rebel Angels: Political Theology and the Fall of the Angels Tradition in Old English Literature, toward attendance at the IMC in Leeds.

Brandon Hawk in the third year of his PhD at the University of Connecticut studying Apocryphal Narratives in Old English Sermon Collections, toward attendance at a research seminar in Strasbourg and consulting manuscripts in Vercelli.

Daria Izdebska a second year PhD student at the University of Glasgow studying anger words in Old English, toward attending a workshop in Trinity College Dublin and the INC in Leeds.

Luisa Izzi a post doctoral scholar working in the University of St Andrews, to cover the cost of illustrations to accompany an essay on graffiti left by Anglo-Saxon pilgrims in the catacombs in Rome, as a contribution to a collection of essays about England and Rome in the early Middle Ages.

Karl Persson completing his PhD thesis on Anglo-Saxon Wisdom literature at the University of British Columbia, toward attendance at the Kalamazoo Congress to present a paper and contribute to a panel discussion.

Benjamin Saltzman a PhD candidate at the University of California, Berkeley, toward consulting manuscripts and archaeological evidence in the UK as part of the research for his thesis: Holding the Sacred: Discourses of Secrecy and Concealment in Early Medieval England (600-1100).

John Shafer a post-doctoral scholar with temporary part time posts in Durham and Hull, who needed funding for 4-6 weeks to pursue a research idea about a correspondence between the narrative of Beowulf and an episode late in the life of King David in the Old Testament.

Chelsea Shields-Mas in the third year of her PhD at the University of York researching the role of the reve in Late Anglo-Saxon England, towards completing her thesis.